Podcast With John Parrott – World Snooker

Podcast With John Parrott – World Snooker


John Parrott, who turned professional 40 years ago, looks back on his 1991 World Championship triumph in the new episode of the WST Podcast.

“I got a new cue soon before the Championship,” Parrott tells Michael McMullan. “It was ironic because Jimmy White told me to go and see a manufacturer in London who he got his cues from. I had three shots with it and I knew it was the one. The few weeks before I went to Sheffield was the best snooker I’ve ever played in my life. I was making six or seven centuries on the spin in practice. I was so confident, plus I was fresh and not burned out. So I had a very good feeling going to the Crucible.

“I look back on the first session of the final (when he went 7-0 up on White) and think ‘did I really do that?’ I missed one ball in the whole session. Alan Hughes (the MC) tried to speak to me twice and I blanked him both times. He told me afterwards that he knew I was in the zone, because usually I’ll chat to anyone. I was so focussed to go out and do what I wanted to do. It was probably the best session I ever played.

“I remember leaving the hotel in the morning of the last day, when I was 11-5 in front, and thinking ‘just please let me win seven more frames.’ It would be the worst thing in the world to lose after having a big lead. Thankfully I nursed the lead home, and it’s a victory that is never forgotten.”

Parrott also reflects on the differences between Steve Davis and Stephen Hendry, the two dominant forces of his era. He said: “Davis was the consummate match player, in the top three of all time in that department. Stephen was top three of all time in scoring. He had a tremendous long game and if he got in he made hundred after hundred, as his record shows. And an animal of a competitor. I was playing against two of the world’s greatest, who wouldn’t give you anything.”

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